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Special Collections & University Archives: Dia de los Muertos Fall 2020

This is the webpage for UTRGV Special Collections & University Archives.

Day of the Dead Observance, 33rd Annual Celebration

Welcome to our 33rd Annual Day of the Dead Celebration!

Please join us for our Luncho Libre series of virtual lunch dates.

Monday – Thursday, 10/26–10/29, 12:00 PM (noon)

Cultures around the world celebrate a day of remembrance to honor the dead. In Mexico, it is called Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead. Special Collections and Archives in Edinburg has been celebrating this day since 1987 and observing with the University community since 2007.

This year we are doing things a differently, as we host participants virtually. We hope you will join us during our Luncho Libre series to learn more about this tradition, make crafts, play games, and win prizes! See below for more details on the week's events.

Contact Special Collections

University Library Special Collections & Archives


Email Us for more information
archives@utrgv.edu

Special Collections Series: Day of the Dead

Day of the Dead Lotería

Hosted by Deandra Cavazos & Manny Rodriguez

Register for the session via V-Link.

Please note: Registration for this session will be limited to 30 participants.

Please Note: Video and Microphones must be enabled for participation.

 

Day of the Dead LoterĂ­a

Lotería (or Mexican Bingo) dates back to 15th Century Italy before arriving in Mexico three centuries later! The tablas, or bingo cards, vary widely as well as the style of the game. Traditionally, lotería is played using beans to mark the squares announced, but you can use whatever is available at home.

Our virtual lotería will feature tablas for download and students will log into a live session where our host draws and announces the cards. We hope to fit in several rounds and winners will receive a special prize! 

Read more via about the tradition of lotería online: Toone, J. (2019, April 05). Mexican Bingo. Retrieved October 06, 2020, from https://www.theyucatantimes.com/2019/04/mexican-bingo/

For more information or to get in touch with UTRGV Special Collections & Archives visit our website: https://utrgv.libguides.com/SCA

Day of the Dead: Ofrendas

Hosted by Adela Cadena & Samantha Bustillos

Register for the session via V-Link.

Please Note: Video and Microphones must be enabled for participation.

Luncho Libre Ofrenda

Ofrendas

It is believed by many, especially the Indian and Mestizo population in Mexico, that the Day of the Dead is the time when those who have died are allowed to return to earth to visit with family and friends. Altars serve as focal points to honor and remember either specific people who have crossed over, be they a relative or a public figure, or as a general observance for all.

The ofrendas (offerings) often include favorite foods and beverages as well as pictures of the deceased, candles, sugar skulls, and paper decorations.  The degree of ornamentation of the ofrendas depends on regional tradition, individual wealth and recent deaths, and on the quality of that year’s harvest.

Hot chocolate and pan de muerto, a special bread, are served to the living to enjoy as they reflect on the past year and family.  Many families visit cemeteries together in order to remember and honor their deceased family members.

For more information or to get in touch with UTRGV Special Collections & Archives visit our website: https://utrgv.libguides.com/SCA

Crafting Paper Flowers

Hosted by Lisa Huerta & Frances Caballero

Register for the session via V-Link.

Please Note: Video and Microphones must be enabled for participation.

Paper Flower Craft

Day of the Dead – Marigold Flower – Cempaspuchitl  

There are many kinds of flowers used to adorn altars with ofrendas, but the most common are Marigolds—known for their bright orange or yellow color. In the Aztec culture, it was believed the vibrant color represented the sun that guided spirits into their underworld. The strong aroma of the marigold attracts the spirits and helps them find their way to their families during this time of Day of the Dead. 

Come learn (or show off your) Paper Flower crafting skills!

Materials needed to make paper flowers:

  • Tissue paper, gift wrap, or colored paper
  • String
  • Scissors

For more information or to get in touch with UTRGV Special Collections & Archives visit our website: https://utrgv.libguides.com/SCA

Day of the Dead Trivia

Hosted by Millie Resendez & Deandra Cavazos

Register for the session via V-Link.

Please Note: Video and Microphones must be enabled for participation.

Day of the Dead Trivia

Day of the Dead Trivia

Test your Day of the Dead knowledge and learn more about this annual celebration. Day of the Dead (Día de Los Muertos) is a day of remembrance and celebration in memory of our love ones. Our Trivia questions will include topics such as flowers, origination, festivities, and foods associated with Day of the Dead.

Join us from the comfort of your own setting for our virtual trivia game. Winner takes all!

Please note: Registration for this session will be limited to 30 participants.

For more information or to get in touch with UTRGV Special Collections & Archives visit our website: https://utrgv.libguides.com/SCA